Workshops

Workshop Information

  • Workshops are 3 hours long and cost $55/student
  • If a workshop sells out you can get on a waiting list. As students drop reservations will become available to people on the waitlist in the order they signed up.
  • Workshops are open to anyone but it is recommended that students have some improv experience.
  • On the day of the class students can register in person if the workshop has not sold out.
  • A student’s spot in a workshop is forfeited if they are more than 10 minutes late without notification. Their spot will become available to those on the waitlist.

Questions?

Please contact our Education Director, Asaf Ronen, via this form.

  • World Creation — Marcus Sams

    Moment Improv Theatre, San Francisco, CA

    Saturday, September 1st, 11:00am at the Hideout Theatre

    Using an easy to grasp “If-then” approach to space objects will allow you to systematically create an interactive world that spawns from a single thought at the top of the scene. This approach allows your mind to slow down and brilliant specificity to emerge. Through exercises, drills, and techniques, Sams will provide you with the tools to create an improvised world that you will be emotionally invested in. By investing in the world you will be more grounded and your nerves will calm allowing you to play more freely. In your improv, it is the difference between being a talking head and truly experiencing the story you are telling.

  • Creating Character, Not Caricature — Joe Liss

    Moment Improv Theatre, San Francisco, CA

    Saturday, September 1st, 11:00am at the Hideout Theatre

    In this 3-hour workshop you will explore different ways to improve and sustain your character play while improvising. Great character work helps you make more discoveries, break out of ruts and give scenes new energy (and you’ll probably get more laughs).

  • Improvising in 3D — Butch Roy & Hannah Wydeven (Mayhem)

    HUGE Theater, Minneapolis, MN

    Saturday, September 1st, 3:00pm at the Hideout Theatre

    Do you struggle with creating characters that actually mean something? Do you want to make environments that help inspire and surprise? Learn tricks to creating a character and practice the tools of going deeper. Make your improv feel easy and fun by living in the skin of a fully-fleshed and dimensional character of your creation.

  • Emotions = Relationships = Game — Will Luera

    Florida Studio Theatre, Sarasota, FL

    Saturday, September 1st, 3:00pm at the Hideout Theatre

    We are constantly bombarded with thoughts on what these mean. Some people feel that Emotions are key...some feel that Relationships are key...and others feel that its all about the game. This workshop will show you how are three are talking about the same thing but just from different perspectives.

  • Don't Find the Game, Create the Game — Beth Appel

    UCB Theater, Los Angeles, CA

    Sunday, September 2nd, 11:00am at the Hideout Theatre

    Rather than starting a scene and hoping to "find the game," learn to use your comedic sensibilities and instincts to create a game quickly at the top of a scene. No more scenes where two characters spend two minutes talking about how nice the beach is.

  • Basic Comedic Storytelling — Zeke Nicholson

    UCB Theater, Los Angeles, CA

    Sunday, September 2nd, 11:00am at the Hideout Theatre

    This workshop is geared toward deriving humorous, relatable, true-to-life material to begin crafting a usable storytelling piece. The class will do exercises to unearth interesting nuggets from our lives, and then help identify which of our experiences might be fruitful source material for further polishing. Whether you have an interest in creating an autobiographical one-person show, are an improviser looking to flex a different muscle, or just a fan of The Moth podcast, this will be fun and not scary! Promise!

  • Defining Your Point of View — Jeremy Rowley

    The Groundlings, Los Angeles, CA

    Sunday, September 2nd, 11:00am at the Hideout Theatre

    Explore and define your comedic point of view to have a unique, interesting take in any improvised scene and never feel stuck. Have you ever been given a suggestion for a scene that you hate? Or thought “I got that suggestion a hundred times”. The techniques for the next class will eliminate that negative reaction and also launch you in creating interesting characters and better your writing.

  • How to Be a Person — Edi Patterson & Kevin Kirkpatrick

    Los Angeles, CA

    Sunday, September 2nd, 3:00pm at the Hideout Theatre

    This workshop will focus on allowing characters to come through while improvising as opposed to forcing them. This will happen through a couple of full group exercises, limited pair exercises, and through scenes with side-coaching. Our focus is on specificity and realness in character, which is what we feel drives organic storytelling.

  • Doing What the Scene Requires — Deanna Oliver

    Groundlings, Los Angeles, CA

    Sunday, September 2nd, 3:00pm at the Hideout Theatre

    This workshop is focused on character driven improvised scene work, rather than games. Students will improvise scenes based on minimalist prompts (what time is it, what’s the soup of the day, a scene that starts with a simple gesture, or a look) and will be coached to be real, to be actors, to create theater, to explore and heighten moments and to be fully present and committed to doing whatever the scene requires.

  • Starting the Play — Dan O'Connor

    Impro Theatre, Los Angeles, CA

    Sunday, September 2nd, 3:00pm at the Hideout Theatre

    Getting off on the right foot makes all the difference in great narrative work. The way you build the foundation of a scene helps you commit and have fun. A great platform helps your ensemble to all recognize what the story is about and build it together. This class is about discovery rather than negotiation. It is about having a point of view and emotion to create character and relationships. This class is about sharing those techniques and teaching the experienced improviser new skills and different ways to approach their work. Why should they watch you? How do you consistently maintain a point of view and make your scenes engaging? If you are interested... you are interesting.